Aquamin®

Aquamin®—Nature’s Perfect Calcium

Dear Friends and Valued Customers:
I am proud to present to you what I believe is “Nature’s Perfect Calcium”—Aquamin from Marigot, Ltd. of Ireland. What makes Aquamin perfect? It’s 100% natural and it’s more than just calcium. Aquamin is a complete natural mineral complex produced from specially harvested red marine algae found off the coast of Ireland. But don’t take it from me. Marigot’s commercial manager, David O’Leary, explains precisely what makes Aquamin unique in this interview.

SWANSON: Please tell our readers about your background in the nutrition industry and your role at Marigot.

O’Leary: I have spent over 10 years in the food and pharmaceutical industry working for distributors and producers in commercial and technical roles. Prior to Marigot I was sales manager for Purac, one of the world’s largest producers of lactic acid, mineral lactates and mineral gluconates. I studied Applied Chemistry at Kingston University, UK, and majored in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry.

SWANSON: What is Aquamin, and how is it produced?

O’Leary: Aquamin is a unique plant-derived material. It comes from the Lithothamnium species of seaweed, which is a rare and unique type of red algae that Marigot harvests under license in the Atlantic waters off the coasts of Ireland & Iceland. Aquamin possesses many functional and nutritional properties. It can be easily incorporated into any food, beverage or nutritional supplement product. It contains over 70 trace minerals in total. Our material is harvested from the sea using vacuum technology; then it is shipped to our production facilities where it is washed, sterilized, dried and milled.

SWANSON: How was this particular seaweed discovered and developed into Aquamin?
What makes this specific seaweed a useful mineral source as compared to other seaweeds?

O’Leary: This material was used traditionally as a soil content improver in the middle of the 20th century by the local farmers in the areas near the Southwest coast of Ireland. It was known for being mineral-rich. A Marigot sister company, Celtic Sea Minerals, started harvesting this unique material in 1993. In late 1996 Marigot started selling Aquamin into the global food and supplement industries as a source of multi-mineral enrichment.Our Aquamin ingredient is a unique source of minerals in that it possesses the open, porous physical structure of the seaweed from which it comes. This algae is very inert and mineral rich. It has no impact on taste or texture profiles within a food, beverage or supplement product; it is completely tasteless and highly bioavailable. These properties, along with being from a plant source that is continuously renewing itself, differentiate Aquamin from all other types of naturally occurring minerals or synthetically manufactured mineral salts.

SWANSON: Is Aquamin found in other products besides supplements?

O’Leary: Aquamin is found in an array of food, nutritional supplements and beverage products around the world. Marigot is continuously developing specific food & beverage applications that deliver functionality and nutritional content improvement with Aquamin. Many of the world’s David O’Leary, Marigot, Ltd.largest food producers use Aquamin as a unique source of natural calcium and trace minerals, thanks to the properties I’ve described.

SWANSON: If I am looking for a calcium supplement, why should I choose Aquamin over
other forms?

O’Leary: First and most importantly, Aquamin is not just calcium! It contains calcium, magnesium and over 70 other important trace minerals. It has been well documented in nutritional research that the combination of the calcium and trace minerals together enhances the rate at which calcium absorption takes place in humans and also contributes to bone mineral density. These minerals are present in Aquamin, and they are all naturally occurring and 100% plant derived. This final point makes the product void of any lactose issues, which is a major deterrent to calcium supplementation for many people. Plus, Aquamin is suitable for vegans and is FDA GRAS recognized.

SWANSON: Marigot has commissioned several independent clinical studies on Aquamin.
What have these studies shown? Are there plans to publish this research?

O’Leary: Aquamin studies have shown that our material is highly bioavailable when compared to conventional calcium salts. It enhances bone mineral integrity to a greater extent than other mineral sources. Aquamin is highly effective for nourishing bone and joint health. Our research has shown that the Aquamin material is more effective (faster acting, etc.) than many other supplements widely used in the nutritional industry for this purpose. Marigot is currently working toward having its most recent research peer reviewed and published early in 2008.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Vitamin D and Calcium Combo Increases Bone Density.

Source: Osteoporosis International

Date: 8/23/2011

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body. Average healthy males have about two and a half to three pounds of calcium while females have about two pounds. Approximately 99 percent of calcium is present in the bones and teeth, which leaves only about one percent in cells and body fluids. While the most important function of calcium involves the maintenance of skeletal health, the small percentage of calcium outside the bones is used to maintain a variety of vital body functions.

Vitamin D is known as the “sunshine” vitamin because it is formed in the body by the action of the sun’s ultraviolet rays on the skin. The fat-soluble vitamin is converted in the kidneys to the hormone calcitrol, which is actually the most active form of vitamin D. The effects of this hormone are targeted at the intestines and bones. Decreased vitamin D intake along with not enough sunlight exposure can cause a vitamin D deficiency. Other causes could be inadequate absorption and impaired conversion of vitamin D into its active form. When vitamin D deficiency occurs, bone mineralization is impaired which leads to bone loss. Rickets, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, crohn’s disease and cancer are associated with vitamin D deficiency.

A study published in the journal Osteoporosis International investigated the impact of calcium and vitamin D supplementation on bone density in pubescent girls. The randomized controlled trial included 20 sets of peripubertal identical twin girls who were assigned to receive either 800 mg calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D3 or a matched placebo for six months. The results revealed that supplementation with calcium and vitamin D boosted both bone density and bone strength by between 4 and 66 percent, depending on the bone site tested. These findings suggest that supplementation with calcium and vitamin D in pubescent females may be an effective way to reduce the future risk of osteoporosis by increasing bone strength and density during the peak of bone mass build-up.

Greene DA, Naughton GA. Calcium and vitamin-D supplementation on bone structural properties in peripubertal female identical twins: a randomised controlled trial. Osteoporos Int. Feb2011;22(2):489-98.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Calcium plus vitamin D cuts melanoma incidence 57%: Stanford study

Stanford University School of Medicine researchers, NPI Center

Jun. 28, 2011

According to a new study by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers, a combination of calcium and vitamin D may cut the chance of melanoma in half for some women at high risk of developing this life-threatening skin cancer.

A combination of calcium and vitamin D may cut the chance of melanoma in half for some women at high risk of developing this life-threatening skin cancer, according to a new study by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers.

Using existing data from a large clinical trial, the study zeroed in on women with a history of non-melanoma skin cancer, as people with this generally non-fatal disease are more likely to develop the more lethal illness—melanoma. The researchers found that women who once had non-melanoma and took the calcium-vitamin D combination developed 57 percent fewer melanomas than women with similar histories who were not given the supplements. Nonmelanoma skin cancers, such as basal cell or squamous cell cancers, are the most common forms of skin cancer.

“In preventive medicine, we want to target people most at risk for the disease,” said dermatologist Jean Tang, MD, PhD, lead author of the study. “If you previously had a nonmelanoma skin cancer, calcium plus vitamin D might reduce your risk of the more deadly melanoma.”

The study will be published online on June 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Vitamin D is well known for its role in bone growth, but it also affects non-skeletal cells. In many parts of the body, including the skin, vitamin D controls how quickly cells replicate, a process that often goes awry in cancer. Reports from various institutions have suggested that vitamin D is associated with lower risks of colon, breast, prostate and other cancers. Nonetheless, the Institute of Medicine published a report last November saying that more research was needed on vitamin D and calcium, as the evidence was insufficient to prove their having a benefit for conditions other than bone health.

This study is the second to look at the effect of vitamin D supplementation on cancer risk with a randomized, controlled trial.

Tang and colleagues analyzed data from the Women’s Health Initiative, a study that followed 36,000 women ages 50 to 79 for an average of seven years. Half of the women took the daily dose of calcium and vitamin D as part of the experiment; the other half took a placebo pill. Tang and colleagues took advantage of the large and long-term data set provided by the WHI trial to explore whether vitamin D has a protective effect against skin cancer. “Our results include the first positive cancer-reducing effect seen from the calcium plus vitamin D trial,” said Teresa Fu, MD, a co-author of the study and a recent graduate of the School of Medicine.

The lack of protective effect in women without a history of non-melanoma skin cancer may be due to the amount of vitamin D given to the patients in the WHI trial. “The patients in the Women’s Health Initiative were given vitamin D at a very low dose, based on today’s knowledge—only 400 IU per day,” said David Feldman, MD, professor emeritus of endocrinology and a co-author of the study. Furthermore, patients in the placebo group were allowed to take as much vitamin D as patients that were provided the calcium and vitamin D supplements, so the experimental difference between the two groups was small. In light of that small difference, “it’s somewhat surprising that there was an effect on melanoma risk, and I think many potential benefits of vitamin D may not have been detected,” said Feldman.

“These results spur us to do more studies,” said Tang. She is planning multiple lines of research to examine the potential relationship between vitamin D and cancer prevention, including a study that will compare blood levels of vitamin D with melanoma outcomes. Another line of research will examine the effect of larger doses of vitamin D on the behavior of skin cells in patients with high skin-cancer risk.

Other authors on the paper are Eleni Linos, MD, PhD, former Stanford Hospital dermatology resident, and collaborators at the Northwest Kaiser Center for Health Research, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Roswell Park Cancer Institute and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

The study was funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, the National Center for Research Resources and the Stanford Medical School Medical Scholars Research Fellowship.

Information about the Stanford Department of Dermatology, which also supported the research, is available at http://dermatology.stanford.edu/

The Stanford University School of Medicine consistently ranks among the nation’s top medical schools, integrating research, medical education, patient care and community service. For more news about the school, please visit http://mednews.stanford.edu/.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Plant-Sourced Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation Increased Bone Mineral Density

Source: International Journal of Medical Sciences

Date: 5/27/2011

If you are a woman over forty, you may be starting to worry about bone health. Everyone loses bone as they age. By the time a women is told she has osteoporosis, her gradual loss of bone mass has been progressing for years. Men lose bone too, but
only about half as fast as women. Medically speaking, osteoporosis is characterized by low bone density and structural deterioration of bone tissue.1 The soft spongy bone in the wrists, hips, and spine are the most vulnerable to osteoporosis and prone to breakage as a result.

Vitamin D is known as the “sunshine” vitamin because it is formed in the body by the action of the sun’s ultraviolet rays on the skin. The fat-soluble vitamin is converted in the kidneys to the hormone calcitrol, which is actually the most active form of vitamin D. The effects of this hormone are targeted at the intestines and bones. Decreased vitamin D intake along with not enough sunlight exposure can cause a vitamin D deficiency. Other causes could be inadequate absorption and impaired conversion of vitamin D into its active form. When vitamin D deficiency occurs, bone mineralization is impaired which leads to bone loss. Rickets, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, crohn’s disease and cancer are associated with vitamin D deficiency.

A Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) study was conducted to compare changes in bone mineral density by following one of three bone health plans. Researchers tested 414 women over 40 years of age and 176 of the women agreed to participate in the study and to follow one of the three programs. One Plan contained a bone-health supplement with 1,000 IUs of vitamin D3 and 750 mg of a plant-sourced form of calcium for one year. The other two Plans contained the same plant form of calcium, but with differing amounts of vitamin D3 and other added bone health ingredients along with components designed to increase physical activity and health literacy also for one year.

The results were all three treatment groups with above average compliance experienced significantly greater increases in bone mineral density in comparison to the two expected-change reference groups. The group following the most nutritionally comprehensive Plan outperformed the other two groups. These findings suggest increased compliance with the Plans resulted in increased BMD levels. There were no adverse effects in the blood chemistry tests, self-reported quality of life or daily tracking reports. The authors stated “The Plans tested suggest a significant improvement over the traditional calcium and vitamin D3 standard of care.”

Kaats GR, Preuss HG, Croft HA, et al. A Comparative Effectiveness Study of Bone Density Changes in Women Over 40 Following Three Bone Health Plans Containing Variations of the Same Novel Plant-sourced Calcium. Int J Med Sci. Mar2011;8(3):180-91.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————

High bioavailability of calcium from seaweed proved

06/08/2004

A natural derived seaweed mineral, produced by the Irish company Marigot, has more bio-availability than industry standard calcium carbonate, according a US study.
The investigation compared the effects of two calcium supplements in 12 pre-menopausal women and revealed a higher degree of bioavailability for Aquamin F than industry standard calcium carbonate, reported the researchers.

Twelve healthy females aged 20 to 40 took part in the trial, which was made up of three 12-hour study periods over a total of three weeks. At each interval, the subject was given a single oral dose of one of the three test articles, either placebo, calcium carbonate (720mg elemental calcium) or Aquamin F (720g elemental calcium).

Blood was obtained at 13 times during each study to evaluate ionised and total calcium, magnesium, albumin phosphorus, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and urinary calcium levels. The results indicated a significantly higher calciuric response for Aquamin F (p = 0.004) than the calcium carbonate (p = 0.36), as compared to placebo, and therefore demonstrated a greater bioavailability.

Furthermore, those women who had consumed Aquamin F experienced a more prolonged decline in serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Since PTH increases as calcium drops in the blood, the researchers concluded that Aquamin F suppresses this response for longer and is a further indication of increased bioavailability.

Calcium supplements are widely recommended to help prevent and manage osteoporosis, a bone-wasting disease that affects postmenopausal women in particular. Worldwide, the lifetime risk for a woman to have an osteoporotic fracture is 30-40 per cent, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, and in the next 50 years, the number of hip fractures for both men and women will more than double.

Marigot is a nutraceutical company based in County Cork, which develops and produces natural mineral products for use in foods, such as cereals, processed meats and confectionery. In addition to Aquamin F, the company produces Aquamin S, a sea mineral source designed to enhance the nutritional profile of low pH foods such as carbonated beverages and frozen desserts, and Aquamin TG, a granulated natural calcium source for use in dietary supplements.

Marigot utilises the calcified seaweed, harvested by its sister company Celtic Sea Minerals at Castletownbere, West Cork, Ireland as its primary raw material source.

One of the few plant-based calcium sources, Aquamin is still a long way off from competing with calcium carbonates on the market. At present, Marigot’s European marketing is limited to Ireland, The Netherlands, Belgium, France, Finland and Slovenia, but it is looking to expand and has Germany in its sights as its next port of call. Morevover, Aquamin has proved popular in Asian markets where consumers already know the benefits of seaweed and are keen to market its natural source, and in the US, it is even used in a ‘wellness’ tea.

Share

 

Contact Us | Frequent Questions | Product Information | About Us | Research | Testimonials

SUPER SEA VEG® and Sea Vegg® are licensed trademarks of FarmaSea® Health LLC.
This site is operated by FarmaSea® Health LLC.
Copyright © 2014 FarmaSea® Health LLC.